Real Estate For Horse Owners

Posted by Rachael Coffman on Tuesday, March 24th, 2015 at 8:34am.    986 Views

Horse Properties - Impress Your Clients

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Every now and then you may find yourself working with a client that owns a horse. The way to make that client happy is to wow them more with the stable and pasture than it is with the house. Horse people are seriously passionate about their animals and place their care and needs above their own in some cases. The error with these clients is to show them a property with a few acres and an equipment shed.

Realtor Tips for Horse Property Clients

First things first, ask questions about their horse hobby. Do they trail ride for fun? Do they compete in horse shows and if they do at what level? Do they prefer to have a lot of pasture for grazing or do they exercise their horse in a corral? Asking these questions will impress your client, establish rapport and provide you with the knowledge of their real preferences.

A casual horse owner may prefer more ground on which to graze their horse and ride around on the property. Whereas someone that competes may be concerned about their horse exercising on flat, well drained surfaces and be less concerned about acreage. A very serious competitor will want an indoor arena and an outdoor riding space.

Here are some turn offs for horse owners. Low ceilings in barns. A proper horse barn is at least 12 ft high (horses can hit their heads in a low ceiling barn). Inspect horse stalls for missing boards and nails sticking out. Horses can be accident prone while in their stall, so this is very important. If a client requests an indoor riding area, the minimum you should show them is a 50 ft or 60 ft wide enclosure. Any smaller than that is difficult for a person to exercise their horse in the winter, plus the horse is prone to slipping in a tight space, and yes, less than that is a tight space. Lastly, because footing is important to horse owners, pastures should have grass, not mud, swamps or brushy overgrowth. And the same goes for exercise areas that should be well drained, not slippery and water logged.

In the end, it is important to remember how much value people can place on their pets. Many of us consider the pets as part of the family. A horse is one of the largest pets people keep, but are no less loved. I know many, many horse owning friends that live in very modest homes but improved their stables and land to better accommodate their horse loving lifestyle. Hopefully this article can provide happy trails to future client relationships.

By Rachael Coffman your Greater Columbus Area Realtor

rcoffman@bhhspro.com - 614-352-1794

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